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Cooper Physical Test


Skills Cooper Fitness Test

The fitness standards listed on the following sheets are the point standards for each test that will be used in the testing process. Applicants will be required to pass with an average passing score as set by the program administration. Applicants will also be required to participate and pass at the minimal level listed on the testing sheets. The testing standards are age and gender specific. Applicants that pass with an overall average as set by the program administration and meet the minimal requirement standard will be considered to have passed the physical fitness test.

Vertical Jump Test

The vertical jump is a measure of jumping or explosive power. The applicant will complete the test by standing with a shoulder against the wall and placing a marker on the chart. The applicant will then grab a 2nd marker and jump as high as possible, placing that marker on the chart. The score is the difference between the two markers. One foot must remain in a stationary position until leaving the floor. You may step back with the other foot prior to jumping. You may use your arms to assist in the jump.

To work on the vertical jump, you should do squats with a straight bar or dumbbells. If you don’t have either you can use something else that would provide you with some weight while squatting. Work with a weight where you can do 10 – 12 repetitions. Do four sets of the 10- 12 repetitions. You can do these once a week.

If you don’t have the ability to work with weights you can do box jumps. Start with a box that is six inches off the ground and jump up onto that and then step back down. Do three sets of five jumps with a three-minute rest between jumps. Once you are comfortable with the six inch box, you can move up to an eight inch box and work on that. After accomplishing the eight-inch box you can keep increasing the height in increments of two inches. This is an exercise you can work on three days a week.

Sit-Up Test

The sit-up test measures muscular endurance in the abdominal muscles. The test is performed with the applicant lying on their back with their knees bent at a 90-degree angle and their heels on the ground. A partner will hold their feet but may not kneel on them. The applicant’s fingers must stay interlocked behind their head throughout the entire test. The buttocks must remain on the floor with no thrusting of the hips. When told to begin, the applicant will raise their upper body by bending at the waist and touch their elbows to their knees and then return to the starting position. The applicant will have 1 minute to perform as many repetitions as possible. You may only rest in the upright position. Time will be called out at 30, 45 and 55 seconds.

If you are having trouble doing sit-ups and you want to become better at them here is an idea to help you build up to a set number of sit-ups. The first thing you want to do is set a goal for the amount of sit-ups you would like to do, for example 60 sit-ups. Start the first week by doing six sets of sit-ups consisting of ten sit-ups per set with a one-minute rest period between each set. After you are able to successfully complete the six sets of ten sit-ups per set with a one-minute rest period, drop the rest period down to 45 seconds between sets. When you are able to complete these sets, drop the rest period again, now down to 30 seconds between sets. Slowly keep dropping the rest period between sets until you are able to fully complete the 60 sit-ups without any rest between sets. To prevent fatigued muscles from overwork, perform these sets only once a day, five days a week.

300 Meter Run Test

The 300-meter run is a measure of anaerobic power. The applicant will perform the test by running a measured course as fast as they can.

If you are having difficulty with the 300 meter you can practice by sprinting shorter distances and working up to the 300-meter. Start with sprinting 50-meters. Sprint 50 meters and then walk back to the starting point and sprint it again. Do this three times and then take a four-minute rest and do these three sprints again. After you feel comfortable with these, increase the distance up to 100 meters and again do two sets of three sprints with a four-minute rest between. Continue increasing the distance as you get comfortable. When you get to 150 meters do 2 sets of only 2 sprints with a four-minute rest between and when you get to 200 meters do 2 sets of just 1 sprint with a five-minute rest between. Work on the sprinting 2 times a week.

Push-Up Test

Push-ups measure the muscular endurance of the upper body muscles in the shoulders, chest, and back of the upper arms. The applicants will place their hands on the ground slightly wider than shoulder width apart, with fingers pointing forward. Their feet may be together or up to 12 inches apart. Their body should be in a straight line from the shoulders to the ankles, and must remain that way throughout the exercise. The applicant will lower their body by bending their elbows until their chest is 3 inches from the ground. (Measured using a partners fist with the fingers in a horizontal position or a 3 inch sponge block) The applicant will then return to the starting position by straightening their arms. The applicant will have 1 minute to perform as many repetitions as possible. You may only rest in the upright position. Time will be called out at 30, 45 and 55 seconds.

If you are having trouble doing push-ups and you want to become better at them here is an idea to help you build up to a set number of push-ups. The first thing you want to do is set a goal for the amount of push-ups you would like to do, for example 50 push -ups. Start the first week by doing five sets of push-ups consisting of ten push-ups per set with a one-minute rest period between each set.  After you are able to successfully complete the five sets of ten push -ups per set with a one-minute rest period; drop the rest period down to 45 seconds between sets. When you are able to complete these sets, drop the rest period again, now down to 30 seconds between sets. Slowly keep dropping the rest period between sets until you are able to fully complete the 50 push-ups without any rest between sets. To prevent fatigued muscles from overwork, perform these sets only once a day, five days a week.

1.5 Mile Run

The 1.5-mile run is a test of cardio-respiratory fitness. The applicant will perform the test by running and/or walking the measured 1.5-mile course as fast as they can. Walking is allowed. It will however make it difficult to meet the standard.

To work on the 1.5 mile run you should run about 2 –3 times a week. If you have trouble running, start off by walking two minutes and running for 4 minutes. As this becomes easier, drop your walk period down to two minutes and raise the amount of running to five minutes. As it becomes easier, keep continuing to drop your walk time down and increase your run time. Next go to 1.5 minutes of walking with 6 minutes of running and finally one minute of walking with seven minutes of running. You should be able to work up to a continuous run with no walking in between. To increase your run time add sprints throughout your run. Run for about ¼ mile and then sprint 100 feet and then continue running. When you get to another ¼ mile, sprint again for 100 feet and then continue running.

The following are the scoring charts by age brackets. Click on one of the following:



 

Last Updated: July 9, 2014

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