RCTC Student Beehive – October 28, 2020

This Beehive was sent out early for you so you wouldn’t miss all the great events and activities in the coming week!

Check out the following links for important RCTC information:

Opt In for Text Messages
Declared Major
Register TODAY!
Financial Aid SAP
Return to Title IV
Need a Job? Check with Financial Aid TODAY!
Watch for these Upcoming Events
Flu and COVID-19: The Facts



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DECLARED MAJOR
To ensure you’re planning the right academic course, check your academic major shown on your degree audit report (DARS) in the eServices site. If you need to declare a major change, please contact the Records and Registration office in person or via phone at 507-285-7268. Major changes can also be made online via an electronic eform. The major change form is found on the eForms site. Be sure to talk to your advisor or counselor before you change your major.

Updates to your DARS audit are not automatic when you change or add a major or submit updated transcripts from another institution.  Please wait 48 hours for major changes to take effect before you view your audit.  Updated transfer evaluations may take 2-3 weeks and an email will be sent to your school account once the evaluation is complete.

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REGISTER TODAY
Spring 2021 registration is OPEN for EVERYONE!

You can register by logging in to the eServices site, selecting the ‘Registration’ tab and the proper year/term, then clicking on the ‘Registration Window’ link. If you have any questions regarding registration, email the Records and Registration office at admissions@rctc.edu or call us at (507) 285-7268 or (800) 247-1296 ext. 7268.

Transfer students may register by participating in an orientation session or by completing the online orientation.

All students are strongly encouraged to meet with their academic advisor or counselor prior to registering for any term.

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FINANCIAL AID SAP
Students receiving Financial Aid at RCTC must be making academic progress toward their degree.  Following each term, students are evaluated to determine if they are maintaining a cumulative (overall) GPA of 2.0 and completing at least 67% of all attempted credits.  Students not meeting these standards are placed on Warning and may be allowed to continue receiving financial aid for one semester.  Students who fail to meet the standards for two consecutive semesters will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension and become ineligible for all types of financial aid.

Financial Aid students are also evaluated to ensure they have attempted no more than 150% of the credits required for their program (including transfer credits).  If the student fails to meet this criterion, also known as “Maximum Timeframe,” the student is immediately placed on Financial Aid Suspension, without warning.

For more details about these requirements and a description of how the policy is applied, please review the RCTC Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.

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RETURN TO TITLE IV
Students who do not complete all registered courses in a semester may be required to repay a portion of the Financial Aid funding which was disbursed.  The amount of repayment is based on the number of days the student attended and/or participated in classes.  The RCTC Return to Title IV Refund policy describes the process used to calculate any amounts that must be returned.  Students who totally withdraw from courses as well as those who simply stop attending are affected by this policy.  Please contact the Financial Aid Office at (507) 285-7271 for more information if you are considering a total withdrawal or if you have stopped attending your courses.  We can help you understand your responsibilities.

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NEED A JOB? CHECK WITH FINANCIAL AID
If you did not receive a work study award on your Financial Aid Award Notification, and you are interested in working on or off campus, please email your name and starID to Cheryl Klingsporn Morgan to be considered for a Work Study Award.

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WATCH FOR THESE UPCOMING EVENTS
Click on the title for more information about each of these events.

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FLU AND COVID-19: THE FACTS
What is the difference between Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19?
Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses.

There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19. COVID-19 seems to spread more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms and people can be contagious for longer. Another important difference is there is a vaccine to protect against flu. There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus. More information about differences between flu and COVID-19 is available in the different sections below.

Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Flu and COVID-19 share many characteristics, but there are some key differences between the two.

While more is learned every day, there is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it. This page compares COVID-19 and flu, given the best available information to date.

Signs and Symptoms

Similarities:
Both COVID-19 and flu can have varying degrees of signs and symptoms, ranging from no symptoms (asymptomatic) to severe symptoms. Common symptoms that COVID-19 and flu share include:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle pain or body aches
  • Headache
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults

Differences:

Flu
Flu viruses can cause mild to severe illness, including common signs and symptoms listed above.

Flu Symptoms

COVID-19
COVID-19 seems to cause more serious illnesses in some people. Other signs and symptoms of COVID-19, different from flu, may include change in or loss of taste or smell.

How long symptoms appear after exposure and infection

Similarities:
For both COVID-19 and flu, 1 or more days can pass between a person becoming infected and when he or she starts to experience illness symptoms.

Differences:
If a person has COVID-19, it could take them longer to develop symptoms than if they had flu.

Flu
Typically, a person develops symptoms anywhere from 1 to 4 days after infection.

Flu Symptoms

COVID-19
Typically, a person develops symptoms 5 days after being infected, but symptoms can appear as early as 2 days after infection or as late as 14 days after infection, and the time range can vary.

COVID-19 Symptoms
How long someone can spread the virus

Similarities:
For both COVID-19 and flu, it’s possible to spread the virus for at least 1 day before experiencing any symptoms.

Differences:
If a person has COVID-19, they may be contagious for a longer period of time than if they had flu.

Flu
Most people with flu are contagious for about 1 day before they show symptoms.

Older children and adults with flu appear to be most contagious during the initial 3-4 days of their illness but many remain contagious for about 7 days.

Infants and people with weakened immune systems can be contagious for even longer.

How Flu Spreads

COVID-19
How long someone can spread the virus that causes COVID-19 is still under investigation.

It’s possible for people to spread the virus for about 2 days before experiencing signs or symptoms and remain contagious for at least 10 days after signs or symptoms first appeared. If someone is asymptomatic or their symptoms go away, it’s possible to remain contagious for at least 10 days after testing positive for COVID-19.

How COVID-19 Spreads

How it Spreads

Similarities:
Both COVID-19 and flu can spread from person-to-person, between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). Both are spread mainly by droplets made when people with the illness (COVID-19 or flu) cough, sneeze, or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

It may be possible that a person can get infected by physical human contact (e.g. shaking hands) or by touching a surface or object that has virus on it and then touching his or her own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

Both flu virus and the virus that causes COVID-19 may be spread to others by people before they begin showing symptoms, with very mild symptoms or who never developed symptoms (asymptomatic).

Differences:
While COVID-19 and flu viruses are thought to spread in similar ways, COVID-19 is more contagious among certain populations and age groups than flu. Also, COVID-19 has been observed to have more superspreading events than flu. This means the virus that causes COVID-19 can quickly and easily spread to a lot of people and result in continuous spreading among people as time progresses.

How Flu Spreads           How COVID-19 Spreads

People at High-Risk for Severe Illness

Similarities:
Both COVID-19 and flu illness can result in severe illness and complications. Those at highest risk include:

  • Older adults
  • People with certain underlying medical conditions
  • Pregnant people

Differences:
The risk of complications for healthy children is higher for flu compared to COVID-19. However, infants and children with underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for both flu and COVID-19.

Flu
Young children are at higher risk of severe illness from flu.

People at High Risk for Flu Complications

COVID-19
School-aged children infected with COVID-19 are at higher risk of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), a rare but severe complication of COVID-19.

People at Increased Risk of COVID-19 Severe Illness
Complications

Similarities:
Both COVID-19 and flu can result in complications, including:

  • Pneumonia
  • Respiratory failure
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (i.e. fluid in lungs)
  • Sepsis
  • Cardiac injury (e.g. heart attacks and stroke)
  • Multiple-organ failure (respiratory failure, kidney failure, shock)
  • Worsening of chronic medical conditions (involving the lungs, heart, nervous system or diabetes)
  • Inflammation of the heart, brain or muscle tissues
  • Secondary bacterial infections (i.e. infections that occur in people who have already been infected with flu or COVID-19)

Differences:

Flu
Most people who get flu will recover in a few days to less than two weeks, but some people will develop complications, some of these complications are listed above.

Flu complications

COVID-19
Additional complications associated with COVID-19 can include:

COVID-19 Emergency warning signs

Approved Treatments

Similarities:
People at high-risk of complications or who have been hospitalized for COVID-19 or flu should receive supportive medical care to help relieve symptoms and complications.

Differences:

Flu
Prescription influenza antiviral drugs are FDA-approved to treat flu.

People who are hospitalized with flu or at high-risk of flu complications with flu symptoms are recommended to be treated with antiviral drugs as soon as possible.

Flu Treatment

COVID-19
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has developed guidance on treatment of COVID-19external icon, which will be regularly updated as new evidence on treatment options emerges.

While remdesivir is an antiviral agent that is being explored as a treatment for COVID-19 and is available under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), there are currently no drugs or other therapeutics approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent or treat COVID-19. Studies are in progress to learn more.

What to Do If You Are Sick with COVID-19

Vaccine

Similarities:
Vaccines for COVID-19 and flu must be approved or authorized for emergency use (EUA) by the FDA.

Differences:

Flu
There are multiple FDA-licensed influenza vaccines produced annually to protect against the 3 or 4 flu viruses that scientists anticipate will circulate each year.

Flu Vaccines

COVID-19
Currently there is no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. Vaccine developers and other researchers and manufacturers are expediting the development of a vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

Prevent Getting Sick with COVID-19

Information from: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/symptoms/flu-vs-covid19.htm?ACSTrackingID=SCDC_2067-DM41308&ACSTrackingLabel=Toolkit%20for%20Youth%20Sports%20%7C%20COVID-19&deliveryName=SCDC_2067-DM41308

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